If You Get a Text Message or Phone Call about a Package Delivery Do NOT Click on the Link!

Parcel or package delivery scam

By now you know a lot about spam emails, and if you are like the average Internet user you are quite wary about them. But now fraudsters are changing tactics and sending text and email messages that look real by posing as package delivery or shipping delivery companies. Since scammers are aware that more people are shopping online at the moment compared to any other time, they are riding on the flurry of online activities hoping that shoppers will make some mistakes they can exploit. One of the tactics they are using is tricking people by using package delivery messages.

Many people have recently reported receiving messages reading “[Name], we came across a parcel from [month] pending for you. Kindly confirm for delivery here [link]”. When you open the link, you are informed that the alleged package is free but in order to receive it, you need to enter your credit card details to pay for shipping.


Most of the time, the primary email or text message notifying you of the package claims to have originated from a reputable and well-known delivery company such as UPS, U.S. Postal Service, or FedEx. In some instances, the text will say that the delivery company tried to drop off the package at your address with no success and continue to request you to reschedule another delivery. The accompanying link is aimed at helping you straighten things out to avoid a repeat of the unsuccessful delivery. On the surface, it sounds like something reputable, but it’s all false.

The fraudsters hope that you normally order so many items online that you hardly have time to verify all your purchases. Or perhaps you will think a relative or friend sent you a gift without informing you.

If the scammers aren’t working through email or text messages, you are likely to get a call from someone claiming that they work for a delivery company. The caller will say they need your credit card information or other personal details to drop off the package. Essentially, the crooks are trying to mine data using the pretext of requesting information to assist them in delivering your package.

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To avoid falling into the scammer’s trap, if you get any unsolicited emails or phone calls from a delivery service do not respond to them or provide personal information. Normally, delivery companies do not contact you via email or phone calls. If they are unable to deliver your parcel, they leave a note at your door or contact you within the privacy of your online account. In addition, do not click on any links, or open any attachments, contained within any unsolicited email or text message. And in spite of how much the communication sounds friendly or looks genuine, do not provide your personal data.

Basically, if your gut feeling tells you something is off, just trust it. Better safe than sorry.

No Paywall Here!
The Internet Patrol is and always has been free. We don't hide our articles behind a paywall, or restrict the number of articles you can read in a month if you don't give us money. That said, it does cost us money to run the site, so if something you read here was helpful or useful, won't you consider donating something to help keep the Internet Patrol free?
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