The New Kindle Fire: The First Tablet to Get it Right and Offer Full Parental Controls?

The new Kindle Fire HD has broken the mold by being the only tablet to finally offer parental controls over what their kids access. While parents go to great lengths to control their child’s TV and PC usage, the tablets have managed to slip by the radar, allowing children unhindered access to the very same things that parents have kept them from on other devices. And at only $199, this kid-friendly tablet has quite an attractive pricetag.

‘Bic for Her’ Lady Pen Burned by Internet Review Flames

A pen for women must mean that it has lipstick on one end, right? BIC pens is the latest group to find themselves in hot water with women. Did they make politically incorrect commentary on the anatomy and physiology of women? No. Did they donate $100 million to the “I hate women for life” campaign? No. What they did make, though, is a pen. A lady pen, to be specific, and it has the women of Amazon.com fuming.

Fake Amazon Cancellation Email Hides Canadian Pharmacy Spam Links

Not content with sending fake Amazon confirmation emails, the outfit sending out the Canadian pharmacy spam is now sending out fake Amazon.com order cancellation emails, too, claiming that your Amazon order has been cancelled. “Amazon.com – Your Cancellation (0046-68878-96071)” says the email’s subject (although the “order number” may change) – but of course the link to check “ORDER INFORMATION” really takes you to a Canadian pharmacy spam site, hawking Viagra, Cialis and the like. In the example below, the fake cancellation contains links to http://www.dinnerinperu.com/quadratical, which redirects to http://weightbreezy.com, which is a Canadian pharmacy spam site.

Fake Amazon “Your Confirmation” Phishing Emails Hide Canadian Pharmacy Spam

A spate of fake “Amazon.com – Your Confirmation” emails is making the rounds – they are phishing emails, with the supposed ‘Amazon’ links actually being hidden links going to such interesting places as http://drevmash.alfaspace.net/admiral.html, http://gofiberzone.com/upper.html, and meeknew.com. The subject (which so far appears to use the same “confirmation” number for everyone), is “Amazon.com – Your Confirmation (0113-567494-3518071)” and supposedly comes from the email address order-update@amazon.com. In reality, they are coming from IP address 124.217.216.112, and the emails are sent from (almost certainly spoofed) email addresses such as claude.simpson@ameritrade.com and lwjtvbwrqksz@young-world.com.