Social Media Uses this Trick to Extract Your Personal Data from You. DETOUR Law Would Make Using these Shady Dark Patterns Illegal

Legislation introduced in Washington would make the practice of using so-called ‘dark patterns’ illegal. The bipartisan (!) bill is called the DETOUR Act, and stands for the Deceptive Experiences To Online Users Reduction (DETOUR) Act. Dark patterns are web interface designs created to manipulate users into taking actions and providing data that they otherwise wouldn’t. Dark patterns are based on behavioral psychology.

ATT Starts Tagging Telemarketer Calls and ATT and Comcast Announce Anti-Robocalling Caller ID Partnership

AT T has started tagging telemarketer calls, so that if you have AT T and receive a telemarketing call, you will instantly know that is what it is. Concurrently, AT T and Comcast have announced a new Caller ID technology partnership which they are calling an “anti-robocalling milestone”, and in which calls that are authenticated and verified will show that the caller is verified.

Mark Zuckerberg Announces that Facebook Will Now Be All About Privacy and Unified Messaging Across WhatsApp, Instagram, and Facebook Messenger

In 2010 Mark Zuckerberg (in)famously announced that “Privacy was no longer the social norm.” That was when Facebook reset (relaxed) the privacy settings for all of their users. So the Internet sat up and took notice when yesterday Mark Zuckerberg said “I believe we should be working towards a world where people can speak privately and live freely knowing that their information will only be seen by who they want to see it.”

Here’s what Amazon is Recording and Storing for Their Use When You Talk to Alexa on your Amazon Echo Device – and How to Delete It

More than 25million people in the U.S. have installed an Echo, Echo Dot, or Echo Look in their home or office. And still, very few understand that every time you tell Alexa to do something, Amazon is recording, storing, and using your voice commands. Here’s exactly what and how Amazon is recording, storing, and using what you say, and how to delete those recordings.

ANA Admits This Week to Data Breach it Knew about While Fighting Breach Notification Legislation in December

The Association of National Advertisers (ANA) admitted this week that it had suffered a data breach last August through October (2018), about which it learned last October (2018), but which it only advised those affected this week (the last week of January, 2019). Consider these dates when also considering the fact that just last month (December 2018, two months after ANA knew about the data breach) ANA was pushing back, hard, against legislation regarding more stringent requirements for – wait for it – notification of data breaches.

Bug in FaceTime Lets Callers Hear Your Audio Even if You Haven’t Accepted the Call – Also How to Disable FaceTime

In the past 24 hours it was revealed, and then admitted by Apple, that a bug in the FaceTime app was allowing FaceTime callers to listen in on the audio of what was going on around the recipient’s device before the recipient picked up the call. And if the recipient pressed the button to reject the call, instead of ending the call it would start broadcasting video from the recipient’s device as well!

Facebook says Millions of Pictures Exposed by ‘Bug’ – Including Unpublished Ones

Facebook has announced that up to 1500 third-party Facebook apps had access to user photos that they were not supposed to be able to access – including unpublished photos. The self-inflicted privacy hole was due to a ‘bug’ in the Facebook photo API which, Facebook says, granted the apps unpermitted access to the photos of as many as 6.8 million Facebook users for 12 days in September of 2018.

All About the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 – California’s Own Version of GDPR: An Overview and FAQ

Two weeks ago California passed AB 375, now Title 1.81.5 of the California Code, and known as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (AB stands for Assembly Bill, meaning it was first introduced in the Assembly; SB would mean it had been introduced in the Senate). Also now known as the CCPA, the original sponsors of AB375 were California Assemblyman Edwin Chau, and California Senators Bob Hertzberg and Bill Dodd, Democrats all. The CCP is the California equivalent of GDPR.