Amazon Grabs for .Amazon Domain over Objections of Amazon River Countries

The nations of the Amazon rainforest have all but lost the battle over the dot Amazon domain (.Amazon), with the governing body, ICANN, saying that Amazon.com’s application for the .Amazon TLD can proceed. The Amazon basin nations, represented by the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization (ACTO) include Peru, Brazil, Ecuador, Colombia, Bolivia, Venezuela, Guyana and Suriname.

Social Media Uses this Trick to Extract Your Personal Data from You. DETOUR Law Would Make Using these Shady Dark Patterns Illegal

Legislation introduced in Washington would make the practice of using so-called ‘dark patterns’ illegal. The bipartisan (!) bill is called the DETOUR Act, and stands for the Deceptive Experiences To Online Users Reduction (DETOUR) Act. Dark patterns are web interface designs created to manipulate users into taking actions and providing data that they otherwise wouldn’t. Dark patterns are based on behavioral psychology.

California Enacts New Net Neutrality Law, Justice Department Sues to Strike it Down, Full Text of Justice and CA Sen. Scott Wiener’s Statement

California governor Jerry Brown signed a new California net neutrality law into law yesterday (yes, on a Sunday, September 30th), and on that same Sunday, hours later, the Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against California’s new net neutrality law, saying that it “unlawfully imposes burdens on the Federal Government’s deregulatory approach to the Internet.”

All About the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 – California’s Own Version of GDPR: An Overview and FAQ

Two weeks ago California passed AB 375, now Title 1.81.5 of the California Code, and known as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (AB stands for Assembly Bill, meaning it was first introduced in the Assembly; SB would mean it had been introduced in the Senate). Also now known as the CCPA, the original sponsors of AB375 were California Assemblyman Edwin Chau, and California Senators Bob Hertzberg and Bill Dodd, Democrats all. The CCP is the California equivalent of GDPR.

The Carpenter v. United States Cell Phone Location Privacy Supreme Court Decision Explained in Plain English (plus link to full text of decision)

In a fairly stunning win for mobile phone privacy, the Supreme Court has ruled that law enforcement agencies must obtain a warrant before they can demand and receive from mobile carriers and mobile providers access to the cell phone location data (known as ‘cell site location information’, or CSLI for short) of a given cellular phone. In the case of Carpenter v. United States, the Supreme Court held that tracking a cell phone is barely different than putting an ankle bracelet on an individual and monitoring their movements, and so overturned related case law that has been around for (up to) decades.

Explained: Supreme Court Hands Down Internet Sales Tax Law of the Land in South Dakota v. Wayfair (includes link to full text of SC opinion)

With today’s Supreme Court decision in the Wayfair v. South Dakota case, the Supremes have cleared the way for states to collect sales tax from Internet-based merchants who do not have a physical presence within the state; however the ruling is quite narrow in its scope and so does not open the floodgates for states to tax anybody and everybody who arguably does business online within a given state. Read on for a plain English explanation of this Internet sales tax decision, as well as a link to the full South Dakota v. Wayfair decision and the dissenting opinions.