Amazon Echo Recordings and Fitbit Tracking Used as Evidence in Murder Trials – Smart Devices as Witnesses for the Prosecution

Amazon Echo Recordings and Fitbit Tracking Used as Evidence in Murder Trials – Smart Devices as Witnesses for the Prosecution

Earlier this week we wrote about what Amazon is recording and storing for their use when you talk to Alexa on your Amazon Echo device. We also told you how to delete those recordings. Today we’re going to give you some real-life examples of how such recordings are being used in criminal proceedings. And of course the same can be true for Google Home recordings, Fitbit tracking, and any other smart device that tracks your movements or records your voice (or both).

U.S. House of Representatives Passes Email Privacy Act

U.S. House of Representatives Passes Email Privacy Act

For more than four years we have been telling you that law enforcement can get to any electronic communications you have stored for more than 180 days in the cloud (and that ‘cloud’ is just a fancy word for “somebody else’s computer”). This is because the Electronics Communication Privacy Act (ECPA) only requires a subpoena in order for a governmental agency to get at those communications records that you have stored on that third-party server – they do not need a warrant.

Google Reveals Law Enforcement Requests

Google Reveals Law Enforcement Requests

Google is making clear how they will be handling warrants and subpoenas for users’ personal information. With January 28th being Data Privacy Day, Google Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, David Drummond, shared three initiatives on the Google blog, which detail how Google plans to protect user privacy when faced with a warrant or subpena to hand over private user information.

No Warrant Necessary for Law Enforcement to Access Data Stored in the Cloud

No Warrant Necessary for Law Enforcement to Access Data Stored in the Cloud

With the recent decision in the Fricosu case, ruling that one can be forced to provide the password to your encrypted hard drive, you may be thinking it is better to store things “in the cloud”. In fact, it can be worse, as cloud storage currently requires no warrant for law enforcement to access any of your data which has been stored in the cloud for at least 180 days.