Amazon Opens 7 New Fulfillment Centers; Offers ‘Order and Pick Up’ at Whole Foods for Prime Members

In case you were wondering whether Amazon might be slowing down in any way – they’re not. In fact, in addition to their looking for the location for their second headquarters, they have announced that they are opening seven new fulfillment centers in August alone! Salt Lake City, Orlando, Las Vegas, Aberdeen MD, Shelby Township MI, and Troutdale OR are all seeing a new fulfillment center open this month, and Las Vegas has not one, but two new Amazon fulfillment centers opening in August. Separately, Amazon has also announced a new perk for Prime members: you can now place an order with Whole Foods through the Prime app, and it will not only be waiting for you when you arrive, but a Whole Foods team member will bring your order out to your car!

Get Notified by Text Message of Amazon Deliveries, Shipments and More!

Here’s a nifty, little known service offered by Amazon: text message (i.e. SMS) notifications of when an Amazon order is delivered to your door, as well as when an order has been shipped, when a refund has been posted to your account, etc.. In this day and age of so-called ‘porch pirates’ (people who follow the UPS truck and steal your packages as soon as they are delivered) this is proving to be a very useful service!

UPS Using All Sorts of Mobile Technology to Spy on UPS Drivers

UPS trucks are equipped with a dizzying array of technology – including 200 telematics sensors – that UPS is using to spy on drivers. According to UPS, the driver surveillance is used to optimize delivery and the company’s bottom line. From knowing when a driver buckles their seatbelt, to every time the driver opens and closes the door (using a remote keyfob because using a key takes too long), to the exact moment each time the driver starts or stops the engine, to how often and for how long a driver backs up, UPS is monitoring every little detail of their drivers’ day.

Detroit Newspapers First to Openly Concede Defeat to the Internet

The Detroit News and Detroit Free press have conceded defeat to the Internet, and are cutting home delivery of the print version of their newspapers to just three days a week, and supplementing them by emailing a digital version to subscribers instead. “The dynamics of delivering information to audiences has changed forever due to technology,” said David Hunke, publisher of the Detroit Free Press. “We’re fighting for our survival.”