Court’s Subtext in AT&T Time Warner Lawsuit Warns ‘Don’t Bother Appealing’ (Includes Full Text of ATT Time Warner Opinion)

In an unusual move, the Court that issued the decision in the AT&T Time Warner antitrust lawsuit yesterday warned the losing party (that would be the U.S. Department of Justice ), essentially, not to bother trying to appeal his ruling. In his 172 page ruling in the case of the United States of America versus ATT Inc, et al, Judge Richard Leon says, among other things, and we quote, “I do not believe that the Government has a likelihood of success on the merits of an appeal.”

Mugshots.com Torn a New One by Judge for Charging for Removals

A few years ago we told you about some lawsuits against Mugshots.com and other websites which post the mug shots of those charged with crimes. While the particular lawsuit that we covered, Kaplan and Lashway v. Mugshots, et al, was settled, others were not, and now a Federal judge has ruled that the plaintiffs in a case out of Illinois and Florida against Mugshots.com and UnpublishArrest.com have made a strong enough case for it to move forward, despite the defendants’ motion to dismiss the entire lawsuit for failure to state a claim upon which relief can be granted (known to legal folks as a Rule 12(b)(6) motion).

Latest in Apple FBI iPhone Wranglings: Just 1 Phone Turns Out to Already be at least 12 Phones (plus Full Text of FBI Motion)

As we recently reported, the FBI (and so the Federal government) is trying to force Apple to assist them in unlocking the iPhone that belonged to San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. A Federal court ordered Apple to do so, and so far Apple has resisted. Part of the heart of the FBI’s argument is that this will affect only one phone, while Apple has insisted that it’s much larger than that – that an order to help unlock one phone will lead to a dangerous precedent of being ordered to help unlock any number of phones. The Feds have steadfastly insisted it is “just this one.” However, recent court filings have revealed that in fact there are as many as a dozen iPhones in other cases just waiting for Apple to be ordered to unlock them.

Feds Bury New Potentially Crucial Information in Footnote in Apple Terror iPhone Dispute

In Round 2 of the Apple iPhone FBI court dispute, in which the court ordered Apple to alter the iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook, the Feds have filed a Motion to Compel Apple to comply with the order, in which they mention, in passing in a footnote, that the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health (SBCDPH) actually changed the password to the iCloud account to which the phone was backing up, thwarting any further backups of the phone’s data, between the time it was recovered from Farook’s vehicle, and handing it over to the FBI.

Court Rules that New York Residents Can Use eHail “Hail a Taxi Cab” App

A New York court has ruled that Manhattan residents can legally use the e-Hail “hail a cab” app to which the private car-for-hire and livery industry had objected. One of the apps, called the “New York Taxi Cab Riders – NYC Taxi Free” app, from Mphony, is the companion app to the “NY Taxi Cab for Drivers and Service Providers – NYC Taxi for Drivers” app, which New York City taxi cab drivers can run on their iPhones or iPads, and which shows where fares wanting to hail a cab are located. However, recently NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission Commissioner David Yassky said that Uber would be the service that would participate in a year-long pilot program.

Rutgers Student Charged with Webcam Spying on Gay Roomate who Later Committed Suicide Given Minimal Jail Sentence

It is one of the sleaziest, creepiest uses for a webcam and the Internet: spying on your room mate while they are having a close encounter of the intimate kind, and broadcasting the fact on Twitter and sharing it through iChat. But it is not a hate crime, even when you announce that you “saw him making out with a dude.” That is the finding of New Jersey Judge Glenn Berman, in sentencing Dharun Ravi to 30 days in jail following Ravi’s actions, and the subsequent suicide of his roommate Tyler Clementi.

Court Rules that Deleted Facebook Posts are Fair Game

If you think that because your Facebook or Twitter profile is set to “private” that it means that you can control who will see what you post, think again. In fact, even if you delete what you have posted – in your private account – you can still be forced to let others see it, even after you’ve deleted it. That’s the Court ruling in a recent case involving plaintiff Kathleen Romano, who may have deleted postings, made to her private Facebook and MySpace accounts, which would be beneficial to the defendant, the Steelcase chair company.