Amazon Tells Customers “We inadvertently disclosed your name and email address” but Nothing More

Amazon Tells Customers “We inadvertently disclosed your name and email address” but Nothing More

Countless Amazon customers woke up this morning to an email from Amazon telling them that “our website inadvertently disclosed your name and email address due to a technical error.” And, in fact, that’s just about all the email said, other than “the issue has been fixed” and that there is no need for the customer to take any action.

All About the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 – California’s Own Version of GDPR: An Overview and FAQ

All About the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 – California’s Own Version of GDPR: An Overview and FAQ

Two weeks ago California passed AB 375, now Title 1.81.5 of the California Code, and known as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (AB stands for Assembly Bill, meaning it was first introduced in the Assembly; SB would mean it had been introduced in the Senate). Also now known as the CCPA, the original sponsors of AB375 were California Assemblyman Edwin Chau, and California Senators Bob Hertzberg and Bill Dodd, Democrats all. The CCP is the California equivalent of GDPR.

Thought Someone Was Blocked on Facebook?  Think Again as Facebook Announces Blocking Bug Hit Nearly 1million FB Users

Thought Someone Was Blocked on Facebook? Think Again as Facebook Announces Blocking Bug Hit Nearly 1million FB Users

Earlier this week, in fact just before the 4th of July (was that planned, knowing fewer people would be paying attention?), Facebook announced that a “blocking bug” (actually an “unblocking bug – some outlets have been referring to it as a virus) had hit more than 800,000 users, causing people that the Facebook users had blocked to become unblocked, with no notice or warning.

Explained: Supreme Court Hands Down Internet Sales Tax Law of the Land in South Dakota v. Wayfair (includes link to full text of SC opinion)

Explained: Supreme Court Hands Down Internet Sales Tax Law of the Land in South Dakota v. Wayfair (includes link to full text of SC opinion)

With today’s Supreme Court decision in the Wayfair v. South Dakota case, the Supremes have cleared the way for states to collect sales tax from Internet-based merchants who do not have a physical presence within the state; however the ruling is quite narrow in its scope and so does not open the floodgates for states to tax anybody and everybody who arguably does business online within a given state. Read on for a plain English explanation of this Internet sales tax decision, as well as a link to the full South Dakota v. Wayfair decision and the dissenting opinions.