Supreme Court Says Advertising Child Pornography with No Real Children or Even With No Children at All Still Punishable Under Law
0 (0)

The Internet Patrol - Patrolling the Internet for You
Rate this post!
 

In a decision that could have far-reaching ramifications for thousands of Internet advertisers and businesses, the Supreme Court of the United States this week affirmed a law which criminalizes advertising pornography as involving children even if the children don’t actually exist (such as are CGI), are not actually minors (such as very young looking adults playing the part of underaged children) or, in fact, even if there are no children in the images at all!

This week’s decision by the Supreme Court holds that the PROTECT Act (Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today) is constitutional in criminalizing the advertising of child pornography for sale or trade even if no actual child is involved – or even if the material itself doesn’t exist.


The bottom line is that if you advertise either believing that there are children involved (even when there aren’t), or you intentionally allow someone to believe that what you are advertising involves real children (even when it doesn’t), you face criminal prosecution under the PROTECT Act.

The PROTECT Act now applies to “any person who knowingly advertises, promotes, presents, distributes, or solicits” any material which could be construed to be child pornography – or in a fashion intended to convince someone that the material is child pornography depicting real children, even if it doesn’t.

Obviously, we don’t condone child pornography, however, the potential here for prosecution of people who have not actually done anything wrong – particularly given how the spread of (dis)information on the Internet can end up completely out of ones’ own hands, and out of control – is disturbing, to say the least.

No Paywall Here!
The Internet Patrol is and always has been free. We don't hide our articles behind a paywall, or restrict the number of articles you can read in a month if you don't give us money. That said, it does cost us money to run the site, so if something you read here was helpful or useful, won't you consider donating something to help keep the Internet Patrol free?
Click for amount options
Other Amount:
What info did you find here today?:

 

No Paywall Here!
The Internet Patrol is and always has been free. We don't hide our articles behind a paywall, or restrict the number of articles you can read in a month if you don't give us money. That said, it does cost us money to run the site, so if something you read here was helpful or useful, won't you consider donating something to help keep the Internet Patrol free?
Click for amount options
Other Amount:
What info did you find here today?:

Rate this post!
 

One thought on “Supreme Court Says Advertising Child Pornography with No Real Children or Even With No Children at All Still Punishable Under Law
0 (0)

  1. Without knowing whether or not watching child porn results in some future illegal action on the part of the voyeur, it seems to me, offhand, that watching virtual child porn could result in release of sexual tension and ameliorate further action on the part of child predators. Lacking data, I would say that it may be beneficial to permit virtual child porn.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.