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Google and the EU’s DMA

In a world where your every click, search, and scroll is a breadcrumb leading back to you, big players like Google hold more power than you might realize. It’s 2024, and Google is back in the news, this time for tweaking its online search results. Why? Well, it’s all thanks to the European Union’s new tech rules, the Digital Markets Act (DMA). These rules are like a referee in a game where Google’s been both a player and a scorekeeper.

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The Incognito Illusion: Google’s Chrome and the Privacy Paradox

In a recent and quite revelatory turn of events, Google has conceded a point that privacy advocates have long suspected: even when you’re browsing in ‘Incognito’ mode in Google Chrome, you’re not quite as incognito as you might think. This acknowledgment comes in the wake of a $5 billion settlement to dodge a lawsuit from 2020, shining a spotlight on the often-misunderstood realm of digital privacy.

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Exploring the Quirky World of AI-Generated Online Listings: A Lighthearted Dive

Have you ever stumbled upon online listings that seem just a tad off? Well, it turns out the rabbit hole of AI-generated product descriptions and titles on e-commerce platforms is deeper and more amusing than one might expect. Let’s embark on a whimsical exploration of these AI creations that are cropping up in places you wouldn’t believe!

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Apple’s Sideloading Shift: A Tech Game Changer for EU iOS Users

In a pivotal move, Apple, the tech giant renowned for its walled-garden ecosystem, is poised to open the gates. The buzz in the tech community is palpable: sideloading, a term that might sound like jargon, is set to become a household word among iOS users in the European Union. But what exactly is sideloading, and why is it stirring up such a commotion?

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Apple’s Strategic Pivot: Removing Blood-Oxygen Sensors from Watches Amid Patent Dispute

In a move that underscores the complex interplay of technology, law, and business, Apple is reportedly planning to remove the blood-oxygen sensors from some of its Apple Watches. This decision, seemingly a strategic sidestep, aims to avoid a looming U.S. ban amidst a heated patent dispute.

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The Future of Internet Regulation: What Users Need to Know

In the ever-evolving world of the internet, there’s always something new just around the digital corner. Right now, it’s the buzz about internet regulation changes. You might think, “Regulations? Yawn!” But wait, these updates could really shake up how we surf, share, and experience the web. Let’s unwrap this, shall we?

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Understanding Cryptocurrency: The Basics

Are you intrigued by cryptocurrency but find it as perplexing as a cryptic crossword? Fear not! We’re here to guide you through this beginner-friendly exploration into the realm of digital currencies. It’s time to unravel the complexities of cryptocurrency and set you on a path to navigating this exciting digital landscape safely.

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How to Open an Installer Package on Mac That Apple Can’t Check for Malware

If you’re a Mac user, you’ve likely encountered a situation where you’ve downloaded an installer package (*.pkg file) only to be met with a message saying, “can’t be opened because Apple cannot check it for malware.” It’s a common hiccup in the Mac experience, especially when you’re dealing with software from smaller developers or less mainstream sources. But don’t worry, there’s a simple way around this that doesn’t involve any tech wizardry.

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Decoding the Icons: Your iPad as a Second Screen with Sidecar

Hey there, tech adventurers! Have you ever hooked up your iPad as a second screen using Sidecar and found yourself staring at those tiny icons on the side, wondering what on earth they mean? Well, you’re not alone. Let’s embark on a little exploration to decode these mysterious symbols, shall we? Oh, and don’t worry, there’s also a video guide if you’re more of a visual learner!

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GPT Gmail 2024 Hack Attack: Google’s Surprising Solution? The Classic ‘Off and On’ Method

In what seems like a page taken straight out of the popular sitcom “The IT Crowd,” Google’s latest advice to Gmail users facing a new kind of hack attack in 2024 harks back to the show’s iconic troubleshooting line: “Have you tried turning it off and on again?” This seemingly simple tactic is Google’s response to a recent wave of attacks targeting Google accounts, which are resistant to password changes.

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Google’s $5 Billion Privacy Settlement

In yet another chapter of the ongoing saga of tech giants and their questionable privacy practices, Google finds itself settling a $5 billion privacy lawsuit. This lawsuit revolves around Google’s alleged tracking of users in Chrome (and other browser’s) “incognito” mode, a practice that we’re sure is continuing unabated.

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Navigating the Rough Waters of AI and Copyright: The New York Times vs. OpenAI and Microsoft

Just today, I stumbled upon a piece of news that’s as intriguing as it is complex. Picture this: The New York Times, a giant in the world of news, is taking on two tech behemoths, OpenAI and Microsoft. Why, you ask? Well, it’s all about copyright infringement, and the plot is thicker than a bowl of oatmeal.

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Beware the Latest Call Scam: The National Tax Relief Program Hoax

Just the other day, I received a voicemail that raised my suspicions immediately. It claimed to be from the “National Tax Relief Program,” offering to help clear back taxes. Intrigued and a bit wary, I decided to dig deeper into this, and what I found was a classic scam playing out. Here’s a rundown of the call and why you should be on high alert if you receive a similar one.

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Amazon’s Latest Prime Video Move: A Step Too Far?

I recently received an email from Amazon that really got my gears grinding. It was about a big change to Prime Video, and trust me, it’s not the kind of news you’d welcome with open arms. From January 29, 2024, Prime Video is going to have ads. Yes, you read that right – ads in a service we’re already paying for. And here’s the kicker: if you want to keep your viewing experience ad-free, you’ll have to shell out an additional $2.99 every month.

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Reminder: Amazon Prime Cost has Gone Up to $139 per Year

Here’s a reminder, just in time for the holidays: If your Amazon Prime membership anniversary (i.e. the date on which your membership renews) falls between January and April, be prepared for that $20 jump in your membership fee at the beginning of next year (2024). In May of this year (2023) the cost for an annual Amazon Prime membership jumped from $119 to $139.