Court Rules Free Services Means You’re Not a Customer, So No Privacy Protection

Court Rules Free Services Means You’re Not a Customer, So No Privacy Protection

Peter Deacon had been a Pandora user for years, using Pandora’s free service. Then Pandora shared his private information, including his full name, his music preferences, and what he listened to, both on Facebook, and for anyone searching the Internet, Not cool, he thought, and sued for breach of privacy. But the Michigan high court ruled last week that because he doesn’t pay for the Pandora account, he is not a ‘customer’, and so not entitled to privacy protection.

Court Rules that New York Residents Can Use eHail “Hail a Taxi Cab” App

Court Rules that New York Residents Can Use eHail “Hail a Taxi Cab” App

A New York court has ruled that Manhattan residents can legally use the e-Hail “hail a cab” app to which the private car-for-hire and livery industry had objected. One of the apps, called the “New York Taxi Cab Riders – NYC Taxi Free” app, from Mphony, is the companion app to the “NY Taxi Cab for Drivers and Service Providers – NYC Taxi for Drivers” app, which New York City taxi cab drivers can run on their iPhones or iPads, and which shows where fares wanting to hail a cab are located. However, recently NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission Commissioner David Yassky said that Uber would be the service that would participate in a year-long pilot program.

Court Finds Bank Has No Liability for Allowing Hackers to Drain Customer’s Bank Account

Court Finds Bank Has No Liability for Allowing Hackers to Drain Customer’s Bank Account

A Magistrate has recommended to the Federal court in Maine that a bank (in this case Ocean Bank of Maine) has no liability, even though it allowed hackers to remove more than $500,000 from one of the bank’s customers accounts. The customer, Patco Construction, had been the victim of the Zeus trojan, which steals passwords once surreptitiously installed on a victim’s computer.

Court Rules that Deleted Facebook Posts are Fair Game

Court Rules that Deleted Facebook Posts are Fair Game

If you think that because your Facebook or Twitter profile is set to “private” that it means that you can control who will see what you post, think again. In fact, even if you delete what you have posted – in your private account – you can still be forced to let others see it, even after you’ve deleted it. That’s the Court ruling in a recent case involving plaintiff Kathleen Romano, who may have deleted postings, made to her private Facebook and MySpace accounts, which would be beneficial to the defendant, the Steelcase chair company.

Court Uses Twitter to Order Imposter Twitterer to Stop Twittering

Court Uses Twitter to Order Imposter Twitterer to Stop Twittering

The High Court in the UK took the unusual step last week of allowing service of a court order on Twitter and, perhaps even more unusually, it worked! The order required that an anonymous defendant cease posing on Twitter as Donal Blaney, the blogger behind Blaney’s Blarney, and abandon the imposter account. The imposter account, using the monicker “Blaneysblarney”, looked identical to the Twitter account under which Donal Blaney actually posts, at “Donal_Blaney”.

Court Upholds Sales Tax on Affiliate Sales Generated in New York – Amazon Tax Applies to All NY Affiliates

Court Upholds Sales Tax on Affiliate Sales Generated in New York – Amazon Tax Applies to All NY Affiliates

A New York court has upheld New York’s affiliate sales tax law, dubbed “The Amazon Tax”, which requires that sales tax be collected for all sales originating in New York pursuant to a commission agreement (such as an affiliate program), regardless of the fact that the merchant is not actually in New York – such as Amazon.